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Thursday, October 17th, 2019

Shaaban: Golf can contribute gold medal in SEA Games

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by July 29, 2017 General

Shaaban Hussin believes local golfers have the talent to contribute a gold medal in golf during the Kuala Lumpur 2017 SEA Games next month. — AFP picShaaban Hussin believes local golfers have the talent to contribute a gold medal in golf during the Kuala Lumpur 2017 SEA Games next month. — AFP picKUALA LUMPUR, July 29 — Kuala Lumpur 2001 SEA Games gold medal winner in golf, Shaaban Hussin, believes local golfers have the talent to contribute a gold medal in golf during the Kuala Lumpur 2017 SEA Games next month.

Shaaban said the players have been undergoing intensive training to repeat the 2001 feat.

“I am confident that playing on a familiar course — Mines Resort & Golf Club — would be an added advantage to our players in their quest to win the gold medal after 16 years. I believe we have a good chance of winning the gold medal,” Shaaban told Bernama when met at the Seri Selangor Golf Club (KGSS) here today.

Malaysia has never failed to win the gold medal when hosting the SEA Games in 1989 and 2001.

This time around the task would, be on the shoulders of amateur Chan Tuck Soon.

Four gold medals are at stake in golf — one each in the individual and team events — for men’s and women’s categories.

Shaaban, a former local pro said Malaysia’s main threat would be from Thailand, Singapore and the Philippines.

Meanwhile, Sports Unite and KGSS would organise a unique Junior Doubles Golf tournament for junior golfers aged between 13 and 17, (born 2000 to 2004) with the Shaaban Hussin Cup on offer at the KGSS on Sept 9.

According to Datuk Dina Rizal from Sports Unite, the aim of organising the tournament was to promote the spirit of fellowship and friendship among golfers of different races.

“The draw of partners will be done by Shaaban himself after players tee off. It will be a blind draw format. Players will not know their partners before teeing off,” he said.

Shaaban said: “I want to see young golfers who compete in the tournament to show respect to each other without showing any regard for race, religion or colour of their skin. Unity is the name of the game,” he said. — Bernama

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